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Antonio Vivaldi

Thursday, June 22, 2017


My Classical Notes

June 6

Mozart and Vivaldi, as performed by Elina Garanca

My Classical NotesOn this recording, Elīna Garanča performs music by Mozart and Vivaldi. Mozart: Deh, se piacermi vuoi (from La clemenza di Tito) Camerata Salzburg, Louis Langrée Temerari!…Come scoglio! (from Così fan tutte) Camerata Salzburg, Louis Langrée Se l’augellin sen fugge (from La finta giardiniera) Camerata Salzburg, Louis Langrée Và pure ad altri in braccio (from La finta giardiniera) Camerata Salzburg, Louis Langrée Ah, scostati!…Smanie implacabili, che m’agitate (from Così fan tutte) Camerata Salzburg, Louis Langrée Ch’io mi scordi di te?… Non temer, amato bene, K505 Camerata Salzburg, Louis Langrée Vivaldi: Quel ciglio vezzosetto (from Bajazet) Europa Galante, Fabio Biondi E bella Irene (from Bajazet) Europa Galante, Fabio Biondi Non ho nel sen costanza (from Bajazet) Europa Galante, Fabio Biondi Ah disperato Andronico! (from Bajazet) Europa Galante, Fabio Biondi La sorte mia spietata (from Bajazet) Europa Galante, Fabio Biondi Lascerò di regnare (from Bajazet) Europa Galante, Fabio Biondi Spesso tra vaghe rose (from Bajazet) Europa Galante, Fabio Biondi Coronata di giglie e rose (from Bajazet) Europa Galante, Fabio Biondi Performed by Elīna Garanča (mezzo-soprano) Elīna Garanča’s velvety, versatile voice makes her one of the outstanding singers of the present day, of that there can be no doubt. She followed up her international breakthrough at the Salzburg Festival with two celebrated CD releases in 2005 that laid the foundation of her rich discography: a Mozart recital and the world premiere of Vivaldi’s opera Bajazet. The present album combines the loveliest moments from these recordings. Listen now as Ms. Garanca Sings two arias from Mozaer’s nozzle di Figaro:

Norman Lebrecht - Slipped disc

June 18

Carbon-dating a luminous, lost composer

From the Lebrecht Album of the Week: Never heard of Carbonelli? Don’t feel too bad about it. The Vivaldi scholar Michael Talbot writes that he ‘has remained unknown, even to specialists’. Listen to the music, though, and you will wonder how work of such quality and intricacy could vanish so comprehensively into the mists of history…. The restoration of Giovanni Stefano Carbonelli could be the musical rediscovery of 2017. Read on here. And here. And here.




My Classical Notes

May 28

The Tango Music of Piazzolla

My Classical Notes brings you today a review of “The Sound of Piazzolla” The individual tracks are as follows: Piazzólla: Libertango, with Alison Balsom (trumpet) Escualo Alison Balsom (trumpet) Oblivion Martha Argerich (piano) Histoire du Tango: Bordel 1900, withEmmanuel Pahud (flute) Fuga y Misterio, with The 12 Cellists of the Berliner Philharmoniker Adiós Nonino The 12 Cellists of the Berliner Philharmoniker Primavera Porteña, with Daniel Barenboim (piano) Verano Porteño with Daniel Barenboim (piano) Otoño Porteña with David Aaron Carpenter (viola) Invite no Porteño tenTHing Five Tango Sensations: Asleep, with the Alban Berg Quartett Le Grand Tango with Mstislav Rostropovich (cello) La Muerte del Angel Manuel Barrueco Los Pajaros Perdidos Philippe Jaroussky (countertenor) Concierto del angel Tango Ballet Maria de Buenos Aires Suite, with Gidon Kremer All performed by the Kremer Baltica, Kremer Musica, Coral Lirico Buenos Aires Some of the greatest names on today’s classical music scene pay Homage to Astor Piazzolla. Presented in two distinct programs, the first part highlights the most varied of influences: this is not just about the tango; there are influences from jazz and the classical traditions of Bach and Vivaldi, all brought together here. The second part combines original classical compositions – the ‘tango operita’ María de Buenos Aires, the Tango Ballet and Concierto del Angel. The recordings by Gidon Kremer and his KremerATA Baltica are a true piece of Piazzolla pioneer work. In the 1950’s when Astor Piazzolla went to Paris to study classical composition, the tango of his native Argentina was not considered fit for the concert stages of Europe; these were the sultry sounds of the street; the music of the demimonde. Luckily, the formidable composition teacher Nadia Boulanger encouraged her Argentinian pupil to draw precisely on those roots. Piazzolla at last found his true voice as a composer and bandoneon virtuoso. Today, he is considered the father of tango as we know it today, blending rhythmic vitality with orchestral textures. Twenty-five years after Piazzolla’s death, The Sound of Piazzolla confirms that the founder of Tango Nuevo left as his legacy a unique style of music that sounds just as fresh and vibrant today. Here is the music!

Norman Lebrecht - Slipped disc

April 28

So, here’s how I get to play in the Berlin Philharmonic…

From our string-quartet diarist, Anthea Kreston: I am exhausted. Totally and utterly exhausted. My eyes feel like they need to be moisturized, and I could go for a full-body detox, or a week in Michael Jackson’s Hyperbaric Chamber (recently rediscovered in a storage unit). I am wrapping up the end of the season with quartet, and on Monday we head in to a modified six-month sabbatical, one which was planned three years ago, before the events which eventually lead to uprooting my family from our sleepy little town in the Pacific Northwest, and on three weeks notice beginning our lives anew in a new culture, a new way of life. After I joined, we decided to open the sabbatical on any mutually free days, and so we do meet occasionally, for a concert here or there – in Krakow, Brussels, or the Netherlands. When I learned of the sabbatical I thought to myself – goodness – what will we do in Berlin for six months? We have no connections, we know no musicians or presenters. But, as the year progressed, we did begin to make connections – and to strengthen old ones in the United States. And now I find myself in a veritable tornado of concerts. A musician’s dream – a buffet of musical opportunities a person wouldn’t even dare to add to a bucket list. On Monday I begin putting together all 10 Beethoven Violin Sonatas for a concert series in Berlin. Amongst those rehearsals is the Mendelssohn Octet with an incredible cast of musicians, as well as the odd chamber music reading session with new friends. Then – I get to play as a substitute with the Berlin Philharmonic. Bucket list extraordinaire. I got a call also to be assistant concertmaster for an incredible Opera Orchestra, but I was already scheduled for Berlin. What??? Crazy, absolutely crazy. Then, I head to Italy for a tour with Performance Today – American Public Media’s legendary and utterly charming and insightful host Fred Child leads four busses of classical music enthusiasts through Italy, by deluxe boat and bus, and has asked me to be the guest soloist for the tour. Vivaldi Four Seasons in Venice, three recitals, daily interviews, and I think I even get to be one of those people who hold the microphone in front of a bus and talk. Maybe I can have that super chair by the bus driver that folds up and down. I will also be leading a book discussion group – I love to do this. And of course answering questions about this Diary. A smattering of quartet concerts happen before our family heads to Northern Italy for two weeks with Amelia Piano Trio (yeah Amy Yang! I miss you) – several concerts – and teaching old students from Oregon as well as new students we bring from Berlin, all in a small magical town in the Dolomites. Next – I will be teaching and performing at the Curtis Institute in Philadelphia. And we return from the States just 2 days before school restarts. So there went the Sabbatical. It has disappeared before we even had a minute to catch our breaths. My late evening practice sessions with my hotel mute have taken a completely different bent – the Chaconne, Janacek violin sonata, Kreisler and Biber replace what was once the second violin parts of the major quartet literature. Am I a different violinist now? Absolutely – my nuances are more varied, my commitment to emotional detail refined. Will I still get a little crazy and go too far sometimes? I can’t imagine life and music without that!



Norman Lebrecht - Slipped disc

April 12

Sad news: Sudden death of London principal violinist

Message from the London Mozart Players: David Angel (1954-2017) The London Mozart Players are deeply shocked and saddened by the sudden death of David Angel, our beloved colleague and friend, co-principal 2nd violinist with the LMP for the past 22 years. He will be remembered for his enthusiasm, energy, musical integrity, consummate musical knowledge, all mixed up with a wonderful sense of humour that could lift any situation. All who came into contact with David were touched by his gentleness, generosity and humility as a human being. He is a massive loss to the world of classical music and 100% irreplaceable as a musician and personality within the LMP. He will be sadly missed, and our thoughts are with his family at this difficult time. _ David Angel was a founder pupil of the Yehudi Menuhin School, where he studied with Yehudi Menuhin, Frederick Grinke, Jacqueline Salomons and Nadia Boulanger. In 1971 he won an Associated Board Scholarship to the Royal Academy of Music, continuing his studies with Frederick Grinke and receiving chamber music coaching from Sidney Griller, winning prizes for both solo and chamber music. He was a co-founder of the Maggini Quartet in 1988. David’s solo playing received great acclaim, winning high praise in The Times for performances of Bach’s Chaconne and E major Concerto with the London Contemporary Dance, and in the Financial Times in 1988 for a performance at the Almeida Festival. He played Autumn from Vivaldi’s Four Seasons on many occasions, notably at the Barbican with the London Mozart Players, and was a soloist with London Musici. Co-principal of the second violin section of the London Mozart Players, he led the second violins of many top London chamber orchestras, including the London Chamber Orchestra, London Musici, Orchestra of St. John’s and Sinfonia 21. David was an ARAM and in demand as a teacher and chamber music coach; in autumn 1993 he was appointed Professor of quartet playing at Birmingham Conservatoire, and he was also an Honorary Fellow of Canterbury Christ Church University College and Brunel University.

Antonio Vivaldi
(1678 – 1741)

Antonio Vivaldi (March 4, 1678 - July 28, 1741), was an Italian Baroque composer, priest, and virtuoso violinist, born in Venice. Vivaldi is recognized as one of the greatest Baroque composers, and his influence during his lifetime was widespread over Europe. Vivaldi is known mainly for composing instrumental concertos, especially for the violin, as well as sacred choral works and over 40 operas. His best known work is a series of violin concertos known as The Four Seasons. Many of his compositions were written for the female music ensemble of the Ospedale della Pietà, a home for abandoned children where Vivaldi worked between 1703 and 1740. Vivaldi also had some success with stagings of his operas in Venice, Mantua and Vienna. After meeting the Emperor Charles VI, Vivaldi moved to Vienna hoping for preferment. The Emperor died soon after Vivaldi's arrival, and the composer died a pauper, without a steady source of income. Though Vivaldi's music was well received during his lifetime, it later declined in popularity until its vigorous revival in the first half of the 20th century. Today, Vivaldi ranks among the most popular and widely recorded Baroque composers.



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