Classical Music online - News, events, bios, music & videos on the web.

Classical music and opera by Classissima

Antonio Vivaldi

Thursday, July 28, 2016


Tribuna musical

July 12

Kremerata Baltica: talented excentricity

Tribuna musical Few artists have had such a prolonged and successful career as Lettish violinist Gidon Kremer, born at Riga in 1947. By 1965 he was studying with no less than David Oistrakh at Moscow. In his early twenties he started on a sui generis, maverick way that alternated the standard repertoire with innovative new material, some of it impregnated with the impish humor of a Shostakovich. His virtuosity impressed, but in a leaner, more modern style than his teacher´s. A gregarious man, he soon made friends among colleagues such as Argerich and they recorded brilliant Beethoven. Emulating our pianist´s love for chamber festivals with artists she appreciates, the violinist founded his own Lockenhaus Festival in Austria: there he often experimented with new composers along with the great classics, but he also did humoristic concerts (there´s a truly funny CD of that Kremer trait). And it was at Lockenhaus that he presented in 1997 the string orchestra he called Kremerata Baltica, integrated by 23 youthful interpreters from Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia, the three Baltic countries liberated when the USSR imploded. Kremer was 50 then, he is now 69. His Kremerata (in itself a playful denomination) visited (according to the "biography" in the hand programme) 50 countries in 600 cities (!), offering a thousand concerts and recording 20 CDs. And they have their own Festival in Sigula, Latvia. During his young years Kremer did concertos with symphony orchestras, recitals with piano and chamber music. He came to BA with his pianist wife of that time and showed his double nature playing such curious things as a piece called "Ferdinand the Bull"! Biographies in our hand programmes have the nasty habit of giving no information about previous visits of the artists presented by the institution; they are just translations of an international short biography that often leaves out important information, and to boot sometimes are poorly translated. I can´t believe that Kremer should be described as the violinist with the most traditional career when he is quite the opposite, but that´s what´s printed...Anyway, although I don´t have an archive, I can vouchsafe that Kremer visited us several times, either in recitals or at least once with the Kremerata. Kremer (counting those of the Kremerata) has recorded 120 CDs and has premièred a great number of scores, especially from Russia and the Baltic countries. His contribution has been quite valuable and a reviewer has to take a trajectory into account. However, what we heard at the Coliseo for Nuova Harmonia was a prime example of talented excentricity, something rarely seen at that conservative concert association. So the evening was at turns fascinating and arbitrary. As playing I anticipate a verdict: bingo for the Kremerata, a crack group of fantastic players; but an uneven Kremer, sometimes below his reputation. And in the choice of scores, ear-opening novelties alternated with anodine ditties or bad arrangements. The Polish composer Miecyslaw Weinberg (1919-96) was known in the USSR as Moses Vainberg; a man of real creative power, friend of Shostakovich, his career was ruined by the detestable Cultural Commissar Andrei Zhdanov: Vainberg was arrested in 1953, for his composing was in "Jewish nationalist bourgeois style"... After Stalin´s death the artist was rehabilitated and gradually some of his music was recorded, but he is still little-known. In an incomprehensible mistake, the hand programme lists that we heard his Concerto for violin and orchestra; no, it was the Concertino for violin and strings published posthumously in 2007; and in three movements, not four! It is a beautiful work in a style that respects tradition but always has a personal touch, and it turned out to be the best interpretation from both Kremer and his orchestra. Although the audience went wild, I can´t agree about the strange arrangement by Leonid Desyatnikov called "Quadro porteno", based on Piazzolla´s "Las Cuatro Estaciones porteñas"). The arranger mixes our composer with Vivaldi (bad joke) and veers from the Piazzolla style with winks to Salgán or Pugliese. Kremer´s playing was often harsh but the orchestra was splendid, especially the cellist Giedre Dirvanauskeite. The high point of the evening was the very skillful arrangement for strings by Jacques Cohen (b. 1969) of Mussorgsky´s wonderful "Pictures at an Exhibition", though the addition of percussion by Andrei Pushkarev (member of the Kremerata, along with a colleague, for just this score) wasn´t always helpful. But the playing of the orchestra was memorable, goaded by the extraordinary concertino Dzeraldas Bidva: not just technical perfection but an ideal understanding of each picture´s content. Here comes the moot point. For Kremer did a strange thing: he asked the audience not to applaud until the last item and started the Second Part playing Tchaikovsky´s "Melancholy Serenade" in a correct arrangement by Desyatnikov played lightly by Kremer, without the rich tone such music requires; he went discreetly off the stage and Mussorgsky started. And as the tremendous fortissimi of the last measures of "The Great Gate of Kiev" subsided to a pianissimo (!), Kremer came subtly back and played Valentyn Silvestrov´s slow short "Serenade" for solo violin, in this case appropriately softly...and that was the end! The encores, with soloist and orchestra, were disparate and opposed: a small Oriental melody, very quiet, "Umebayshi", by Jumi Lee; and what seemed like Shostakovich in his most unbridled sarcastic humor but turned out to be Vainberg´s music for a cartoon, "Bonifacio´s vacation", brilliantly played. For Buenos Aires Herald

Guardian

July 8

Sounds and sweet airs: Shakespearean operas quiz

In this year of Shakespeare celebrations, the opera world too is marking the 400th anniversary of the playwright’s death. Glyndebourne not least, with one new and one old Shakespearean productions in their summer season. Do you know your Titania from your Trinculo? Try our quizWhich Italian tenor sang the title role in Verdi’s Otello more than 400 times and was buried in his Otello costume? Luciano Pavarotti Enrico CarusoMario del MonacoFrancesco TamagnoIn Thomas Ades’s opera The Tempest, Caliban’s original speech “The isle is full of noises, / Sounds, and sweet airs” becomes which glorious aria? “Twangling instruments will hum”“This noisy place”“Friends don’t fear” “Friends do fear” In cutting and rearranging the text of A Midsummer Night’s Dream to make the play work as an opera libretto, Benjamin Britten and Peter Pears made one mistake with the plot. Did they:Forget to cure Tytania of her infatuation with BottomForget to cure Bottom of his ass headForget to wake up the lovers; the opera ends with everyone still asleep in the forest Forget to marry off the mortals before Theseus sends them all to bedWagner’s second opera was a flop when it premiered: it was performed once in 1836 then cancelled the next night when only three people showed up. Wagner himself later called it “a sin of my youth”… What’s the opera, and on which Shakespeare play is it based?Die Feen (The Fairies), based on A Midsummer Night’s DreamDas Liebesverbot (The Ban on Love), based on Measure for MeasureMännerlist größer als Frauenlist oder Die glückliche Bärenfamilie (Men are more cunning than women or The Happy Bear family), based on Twelfth Night Die hohe Braut (The High-born Bride), based on The Taming of the ShrewFor the Paris version of Verdi’s Otello, premiered at the Theatre de L’Opera in 1894, Verdi added what to the opera’s third act?Live animals A raffle A Punch and Judy précis of the plot A ballet The text of Hans Abrahamsen’s sublime song cycle Let Me Tell You — composed in 2013 for the soprano Barbara Hannigan — strings together the lines of which female Shakespeare character? Juliet Lady Macbeth Ophelia Desdemona Which two Shakespeare plays form the basis of Verdi’s Falstaff? The Taming of the Shrew The Merry Wives of Windsor Much Ado About Nothing King Henry IVOn New Year’s Eve 2011, Placido Domingo played his first-ever god role and finally achieved on-stage status to match the deified heights of his career. The production was Jeremy Sams’s pasticcio This Enchanted Island — a mash-up of The Tempest, A Midsummer Night’s Dream plus bits of Handel and Vivaldi. It premiered at the Metropolitan Opera. Which god did Domingo play?Apollo NeptuneCupidDionysus Where and when was the first UK performance of Berlioz’s 1862 opera comique Béatrice et Bénédict?London, 1863London, 1963Glasgow, 1936Cardiff, 2001Britten’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream contains just one line of text that doesn’t come directly from the Shakespeare play. Is it: Lysander to Hermia: “Compelling thee to marry with Demetrius”Hippolyta to Theseus: “Thou art foxier than all our subjects put together” Tytania to Puck: “more of thy trippy herb, good sir”Bottom to nobody in particular: “methinks this wall must fall”“No one but a barbarian or a Frenchman would have dared to make such a lamentable burlesque of so tragic a theme”. The words of a London critic for the Pall Mall Gazette in 1890 — but to which opera did he refer? Béatrice et Bénédict by Hector BerliozHamlet by Ambroise ThomasLe Marchand de Venise by Reynaldo HahnRoméo et Juliette by Charles Gounod Among the cast of Jonathan Kent’s 2009 production of Purcell’s The Fairy Queen at Glyndebourne was a corps de ballet of: Bonking rabbits Humping voles Rutting hedgehogsBanging badgers 10 and above. “Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon them.” (Twelfth Night, Act II, v)0 and above."Lord what fools these mortals be" (Midsummer Night's Dream, Act III, iii)5 and above."Our doubts are traitors, And make us lose the good we oft might win, By fearing to attempt.” (Measure for Measure, Act I, iv) Continue reading...






Norman Lebrecht - Slipped disc

May 19

Few traces left of Huguette’s great recorded legacy

A cri-de-coeur from the French harpsichordist Orhan Memed: I’m one of the many students of Huguette Dreyfus whom Jory Vinikour mentions in his touching tribute and who finds himself utterly at a loss to imagine the musical world without her presence. I feel compelled to write to point out with regret how few of her recordings have been reissued. A quick search on the ‘net brings up very little, with only the Bartok and the Bach Partitas released in the last 10 years. I am probably one of the few who has in his possession the list that Huguette kept of her complete discography and I wanted to share it with you…in the hope that readers would see not only how extensive but also how varied it is… and alas how unlucky we are not to have the opportunity to hear these recordings. The Haydn Trios with Eduard Melkus, for example, are gems and I know how much Huguette cherished them as well. Years ago, with her permission, I sought to track down what happened to the old Valois recordings. I found out that the stock (and rights) had been bought by Naive and when I approached them I was sent a polite e-mail to say that the stock was in a warehouse and no one had taken the time to organise and therefore impossible to retrieve. A more recent attempt back in 2014 was met with a similar response. Would it be inappropriate to encourage readers to make their desire to have these recordings re-released known to Naive, Denon, etc.? DISCOGRAPHIE H U G U E T T E D R E Y F U S Chez DEUTSCHE GRAMMOPHON – POLYDOR : J. HAYDN : Concerto pour clavecin et orchestre en sol majeur avec l’orchestre de chambre Paul KUENTZ. (Grand Prix du Disque de l’Académie Charles Cros 1971) Collection ARCHIV PRODUKTION : H. I. BIBER : “Sonates du Rosaire” pour violon et continuo avec Eduard MELKUS. F. COUPERIN : Apothéose de Lully et de Corelli J.M. LECLAIR Sonate “Le Tombeau” pour violon et continuo avec Eduard MELKUS. A.VIVALDI : “Il Pastor Fido”, pour divers instruments et continuo. A. CORELLI : Opus V : 12 Sonates pour violon et continuo, avec Eduard MELKUS. En deux disques. Réédité en C.D. J.S. BACH : Les Six Suites Françaises pour clavecin. “Capriccio sopra la lontananza del suo fratello dilettissimo”. En deux disques. Réédité en C.D. J.S. BACH : Les Six Suites Anglaises pour clavecin. En trois disques. Réédité en C.D. J.S. BACH : Les Six Sonates pour violon et clavecin, avec Eduard MELKUS. En deux disques. C.PH.E. BACH : Sonates – Rondos – Fantaisies – jouées sur un Hammerflügel. Chez VALOIS : J.PH. RAMEAU : Pièces de clavecin (Intégrale en trois disques). J.PH. RAMEAU : Pièces de clavecin en concerts, avec Christian LARDE (flûte) et Jean LAMY (viole de gambe). (Grand Prix de l’Académie du Disque Français 1964) (Grand Prix des Discophiles 1964). F. COUPERIN : Sixième et Onzième Ordres F. COUPERIN : Anthologie de l’oeuvre pour clavecin en quatre disques (Grand Prix du Disque de l’Académie Charles Cros 1962). comprenant 9 Ordres et les 8 Préludes de” l’Art de Toucher le Clavecin”. (Grand Prix de l’Académie du Disque Français 1970). D.SCARLATTI : Anthologie chronologique de 70 Sonates. Coffret de quatre disques. J.S.BACH : Quatre Toccatas pour clavecin. J.S.BACH : La Musique de Chambre: Enregistrement des Sonates pour violon, pour viole de gambe et des oeuvres pour flûte avec le clavecin ou la basse continue, avec G.F. HAENDEL (violon), Christian LARDE (flûte), Jean LAMY (viole de gambe),Michel DEBOST (flûte) et Claude MAISONNEUVE (hautbois). Coffret de six disques. J.M. LECLAIR : Les 9 Sonates pour flûte et continuo en deux disques, avec Christian LARDE (flûte) et Jean LAMY (viole de gambe). (Grand Prix de l’Académie du Disque Français 1968). J. HAYDN : Seize Trios pour Hammerflügel (Pianoforte), violon et violoncelle (sur instruments anciens) avec Eduard MELKUS et E. VOGT. Coffret de quatre disques. (Grand Prix du Disque de l’Académie Charles Cros 1972). Chez ERATO : Père Coelestin HARST : Pièeces de clavecin : le Troisième Ordre. (Série Châteaux et Cathédrales : Strasbourg). C.PH.E. BACH : Concerto en fa majeur pour clavecin et pianoforte avec Robert VEYRON-LACROIX et l’Orchestre de Chambre de la Radiodiffusion Sarroise dirigé par Karl RISTENPART. J.S. BACH : Participation à l’enregistrement intégral de “l’Art de la Fugue” avec R. VEYRON-LACROIX et l’Orchestre de Chambre de la Radiodiffusion Sarroise dirigé par Karl RISTENPART. J.S. BACH W.F. BACH : Quatre concertos pour deux clavecins J.CH. BACH avec Luciano SGRIZZI. J.I. KREBS J.S. BACH : Les douze concertos pour clavecins et orchestre avec Luciano SGRIZZI, Luigi-Ferdinando TAGLIAVINI, Yannick LE GAILLARD et l’Ensemble Baroque de DROTTNINGHOLM. Chez MUSIFRANCE : (Une collection ERATO/RADIO FRANCE pour la musique française) : Henri DUTILLEUX : “LES CITATIONS” avec Maurice BOURGUE, hautbois, Bernard CAZAURAN, contrebasse et Bernard BALET, percussion. (Prix de la Nouvelle Académie du Disque 1994) Chez CRITERE : J.S. BACH : Participation à l’intégrale des concertos pour clavecin avec Ruggero GERLIN et le Collegium Musicum de Paris dirigé par Roland DOUATTE. Chez PHILIPS : Carlos SEIXAS : 14 Sonates pour clavecin (sous les auspices de la Fondation GULBENKIAN). J. HAYDN W.A. MOZART : Sonates pour violon et clavecin avec Claire BERNARD. Chez BARENREITER-MUSICAPHON : Hugo DISTLER : Concerto pour clavecin et orchestre avec les Deutsche BACHSOLISTEN. Chez HARMONIA MUNDI : Bela BARTOK : Extraits de “Mikrokosmos” au clavecin, en un disque. (Grand Prix du Disque de l’Académie Charles Cros 1970); Chez DENON – NIPPON COLUMBIA : W.A. MOZART : Les Six Sonates pour flûte et clavecin KV 10-KV15, avec Andras ADORJAN. C.PH.E. BACH : Quatre Sonates pour flûte et clavecin, avec Andras ADORJAN. J. S. BACH : Quatre Sonates pour flûte et clavecin et Trois Sonates pour flûte et basse continue, avec Andras ADORJAN (flûte), et Joachim RABE (viole de gambe). J.S. BACH : Trois Sonates pour viole de gambe et clavecin, avec Johannes FINK (viole de gambe). J.S. BACH : Musique de clavecin : Concerto Italien en fa majeur BWV 971 Fantaisie chromatique et fugue en ré mineur BWV 903 Fantaisie en ut mineur BWV 906 Prélude et fugue en la mineur BWV 894 J.S. BACH : Inventions et Sinfonies BWV 772/786. D. SCARLATTI : 14 Sonates pour clavecin. J.CH. BACH : 3 Concertos pour clavecin et orchestre avec les TOKYO SOLISTEN. F. COUPERIN : 11e et 13 e Ordres. W.A. MOZART : Concerto pour trois clavecins et orchestre KV 107 avec Georges KISS et Olivier BAUMONT. Deux concertos pour clavecin et orchestre avec la Capella Academica de VIENNE dirigée par Eduard MELKUS. J.S. BACH : Concerto en la mineur pour flûte, violon, clavecin et orchestre BWV 1044 avec Andras ADORJAN (flûte) et Jean-Jacques KANTOROW (violon) et le NETHERLANDS CHAMBER ORCHESTRA dirigé par Kees BAKELS. J.S. BACH : Six Partitas pour clavecin BWV 825/830 en trois C.D. J.S. BACH : Ouverture à la Française – Prélude , Fugue et Allegro en mi bémol majeur – Quatre duetti. F. COUPERIN : Septième et Huitième Ordres. C.PH.E. BACH : Deux sonates pour violon et clavecin Fantaisie en fa dièse mineur pour violon et pianoforte. W. FRIEDEMANN BACH : 9 Fantaisies pour clavier. J.S. BACH : Les “Variations Goldberg” BWV 988 J.S. BACH : 16 transcriptions pour le clavecin de concertos de compositeurs variés BWV 972/987. 2 C.D. W.A. MOZART : Sonates et fantaisies sur fortepiano. 2 C.D. J.S. BACH : Le “Clavier bien Tempéré” Volume 1 BWV 846/869. 2 C.D. J.S. BACH : Le “Clavier bien Tempéré” Volume 2 BWV 870/893 2 C.D. PRIX DU DISQUE GRAND PRIX DU DISQUE DE L’ACADEMIE CHARLES CROS : 1962 : F. COUPERIN : 6è et 11è Ordres (Valois) 1970 : B. Bartok : Mikrokosmos au clavecin (Harmonia Mundi) 1971 : J. HAYDN : Concerto pour clavecin et orchestre en sol majeur avec l’orchestre de chambre Paul Kuentz (Deutsche Grammophon-Polydor). 1972 : J. HAYDN : Seize trios pour Hammerflügel (Pianoforte), violon et violoncelle (sur instruments anciens) avec E. Melkus et E. Vogt. (Coffret de 4 disques) – (Valois). 1985 : PRIX DU PRESIDENT DE LA REPUBLIQUE J.S. BACH : Cinq disques (Archiv Produktion-Deutsche J.S. BACH : Un disque (Denon-Nippon Columbia) D. Scarlatti : Un disque (Denon-Nippon Columbia) Grammophon) GRAND PRIX DE L’ACADEMIE DU DISQUE FRANCAIS 1964 : J.PH. RAMEAU : Pièces de clavecin en concerts, avec Christian Lardé (flûte) et Jean Lamy (viole de gambe – (Valois). 1968 : J.M.LECLAIR : Les 9 Sonates pour flûte et continuo en deux disques, avec Christian Lardé (flûte) et Jean Lamy (viole de gambe). 1970 : F. COUPERIN : Anthologie de l’oeuvre pour clavecin en 4 disques comprenant 9 Ordres et les 8 Préludes de “l’Art de Toucher le Clavecin” (Valois). GRAND PRIX DES DISCOPHILES 1964 : J.PH. RAMEAU : Pièces de clavecin en concerts avec Christian Lardé (flûte) et Jean Lamy (viole de gambe) – (Valois) PRIX DE LA NOUVELLE ACADEMIE DU DISQUE 1994 : HENRI DUTILLEUX : Participation au coffret de Musique de Chambre avec “Les Citations” avec Maurice BOURGUE (hautbois), Bernard CAZAURAN (contrebasse) et Bernard BALET (percussion). DISCOGRAPHIE Parmi de nombreux enregistrements notons: Chez D.G.G. Archiv Produktion: Suites françaises et anglaises de J.S.BACH Chez Valois : l’oeuvre pour clavecin de J.Ph.RAMEAU Chez Harmonia Mundi : un disque de Mikrokosmos de B.Bartok Chez DENON-NIPPON COLUMBIA : des oeuvres de J.S.BACH, C.Ph.E.BACH, W.Friedemann BACH, J.C.BACH, F.COUPERIN, D.SCARLATTI. Les disques les plus récemment parus sont : J.S.BACH: Le Clavier bien Tempéré (Vol.I et II) (DENON-NIPPON COLUMBIA) H. DUTILLEUX : “Les Citations” pour hautbois, clavecin, percussions et contrebasse (MUSIFRANCE. Collection ERATO-RADIO FRANCE)

Antonio Vivaldi
(1678 – 1741)

Antonio Vivaldi (March 4, 1678 - July 28, 1741), was an Italian Baroque composer, priest, and virtuoso violinist, born in Venice. Vivaldi is recognized as one of the greatest Baroque composers, and his influence during his lifetime was widespread over Europe. Vivaldi is known mainly for composing instrumental concertos, especially for the violin, as well as sacred choral works and over 40 operas. His best known work is a series of violin concertos known as The Four Seasons. Many of his compositions were written for the female music ensemble of the Ospedale della Pietà, a home for abandoned children where Vivaldi worked between 1703 and 1740. Vivaldi also had some success with stagings of his operas in Venice, Mantua and Vienna. After meeting the Emperor Charles VI, Vivaldi moved to Vienna hoping for preferment. The Emperor died soon after Vivaldi's arrival, and the composer died a pauper, without a steady source of income. Though Vivaldi's music was well received during his lifetime, it later declined in popularity until its vigorous revival in the first half of the 20th century. Today, Vivaldi ranks among the most popular and widely recorded Baroque composers.



[+] More news (Antonio Vivaldi)
Oct 24
Meeting in Music
Oct 24
Meeting in Music
Oct 23
Wordpress Sphere
Oct 22
Wordpress Sphere
Oct 21
Topix - Classical...
Oct 20
La Scena Musicale
Oct 18
Google News IRELAND
Oct 18
Google News AUSTR...
Oct 18
Google News CANADA
Oct 18
Google News USA
Oct 18
Google News UK
Oct 13
The Well-Tempered...
Oct 12
Wordpress Sphere
Oct 12
The Well-Tempered...
Oct 11
Wordpress Sphere
Oct 9
Meeting in Music
Oct 7
Google News AUSTR...
Oct 7
Google News CANADA
Oct 7
Google News IRELAND
Oct 7
Google News UK

Antonio Vivaldi




Vivaldi on the web...



Antonio Vivaldi »

Great composers of classical music

Fours Seasons Violin Violin Concerto

Since January 2009, Classissima has simplified access to classical music and enlarged its audience.
With innovative sections, Classissima assists newbies and classical music lovers in their web experience.


Great conductors, Great performers, Great opera singers
 
Great composers of classical music
Bach
Beethoven
Brahms
Debussy
Dvorak
Handel
Mendelsohn
Mozart
Ravel
Schubert
Tchaikovsky
Verdi
Vivaldi
Wagner
[...]


Explore 10 centuries in classical music...